Why Modding is good for Fallout 4, and Games in General

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Why Modding is good for Fallout 4, and Games in General

 

 

It’s no secret that Fallout 4 was a massive disappointment. Just weeks after its November launch, gamers had their hearts broken as they found out how lackluster the game really was. Fallout 4 was missing many of the things fans loved from New Vegas and Fallout 3, such as the comedic low intelligence dialog options, weapon degradation, and more branching quest-lines to name a few. However, the most voiced problem about Fallout 4 is the lack of enough content for game. Then came Fallout 4’s DLC in late spring 2016, which was supposed to give gamers what they wanted: more content. Unfortunately, Fallout 4’s flaws tainted the DLC, and still left gamers unsatisfied.

 

Last spring however something great was released: The Fallout 4 Creation Kit, and this is the savior of Fallout 4. For those who don’t know, the Creation Kit is a tool kit that Bethesda used to create the game. Bethesda released it to the public so fans can make user generated content, which are called mods. This is good because modders (people who make user generated-content) can make content that matches or surpasses Bethesda-quality content. Also, there are more modders than Bethesda developers. Therefore, the modders can produce much more content than Bethesda could ever dream of being able to match and have. Tons of mods have came out for Fallout 4 including a mod made by Nvidia to showcase their new 10 series graphic cards which is a first for Bethesda game modding. To give you an idea of the rate of mods that are released on modding websites, Skyrim, which is five years old, has at least 25 mods per day published on the Skyrim Nexus (mod publishing website), and in its heyday Skyrim had over 100 mods published a day. While Fallout 4 isn’t experiencing these numbers currently, they are climbing and will reach this publishing rate by next year.

 

Because of the Creation Kit, Fallout 4 has become the industry game changer it was meant to be because mods don’t just add playable content. They also can change or replace game mechanics, features, or assets. For example, a Skyrim modder by the name of Train Wiz replaced every dragon that was in Skyrim with Thomas the Train from the children’s TV show of the same name, so now instead of battling wild flying beasts, you fight flying trains that toot their whistles and shoot fire from their constantly smiling, creepy, demonic looking faces. This doesn’t add content; it just replaces something for the amusement factor. Not all replacers (term for a mod that replaces an in-game model or texture with something else) are silly, in fact most replacers are serious that make models and textures look sharper. In fact, by today’s standards, a modded Skyrim has graphics compared to games coming out this year.

 

Mods have the power of being able to fix and improve anything in Fallout 4, and are the key for Fallout 4’s redemption, as well as opening modding to consoles which has proven quite effective on Xbox. In fact marketing for the Xbox Ones now are declaring Xbox the best place for AAA Games, Movies and TV Streaming, and Mods. The fact that Microsoft is using console modding as a selling point for their Xboxes makes me think that soon modding games will be a industry standard and will push developers to release their toolkits for their games. Hate how the new Call of Duty is the same as last 5? Never fear, console mods are on the way. Dislike how overpowered a curtain weapon is in Halo 6? BAM, changed it is. Developers could even make modded servers for online games so players can have cheat wars or a match on user created maps.

 

The future is looking really bright for gaming and I can’t wait.

 

Yours, Cooper Hall

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